Andrew Field

“What Becomes of Us as We Read?”: Ashbery and Ethical Criticism

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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What are some reasons why we read poetry? Why turn to a poem over a novel, a play, a philosophical treatise?

Poem of the Week: Mike Hackney

by Andrew Field Poems of the Week
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How to Write a Poem

Poem of the Week: Ammon Allred

by Andrew Field Poems of the Week
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Light Pollution, Match.com Potlatch

Poem of the Week: Zach Fishel

by Andrew Field Poems of the Week
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Horsetails

John Ashbery: A Pageant

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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Characters:Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, W.H. Auden, James Merril, Robert Lowell

Poem of the Week: Josh Lefkowitz

by Andrew Field Poems of the Week
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No Use Crying

“The Imminence of a Revelation Not Yet Produced”: Ashbery and the Pragmatist Sublime

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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“The imminence of a revelation not yet produced” is a remarkable formulation for describing the process of the future unfolding, and it is what I hope to signify by the term the “pragmatist sublime.”

Why Weirdness Can Be a Good Thing: the Aesthetic Satisfactions of a Compelling Strangeness

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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What is the difference between a poem we call mawkish, or overly sentimental, and a poem that carries the right amount of sentimentality and wit?

The Ironic and the Un-Ironic: the Role of the Hero in Ashbery and Creeley

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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If Ashbery’s poems are premised, if distantly, on a hope for the future, a hope for new imaginary communities, a hope for a new way of speaking, Creeley’s poem are cynical about the future, isolated from community, and unable to even speak.

13 Ways of Looking at the Pragmatist Ashbery, OR Getting Down to the Nitty-Gritty: Ashbery and the Central Doctrine of American Pragmatism

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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So what are some other major facets of Ashbery’s relationship to American pragmatism?

“This Was the First Day / Of the New Experience”: Notes Towards a Pragmatist Reading of Ashbery’s Poetry and Poetics, Part I

by Andrew Field Poetry and Poetics
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I want to start with a problem: an overwhelming, close to paralyzing sense that an essay about John Ashbery’s poetry is like a representational critique of a cubist painting.