Emily Vogel

Poem of the Week: Dave Roskos

by Emily Vogel Poems of the Week
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The Food Pantry

Poem of the Week: Adele Kenny

by Emily Vogel Poems of the Week
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Like I Said

Poem of the Week: John Richard Smith

by Emily Vogel Poems of the Week
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Pictures of a Fireman

Poetry and Pregnancy

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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I am roughly five months along, as I am writing this.

Why Poetry is Sometimes Not Enough

by Emily Vogel Writing
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This evening at Catholic mass, while everyone bowed their heads to pray, I asked Jesus not only to help me be good to my husband and my family, but also what he thought about my poetry. I heard a voice, perhaps in my head, or perhaps funneled out the church ceiling which said, “your poetry will touch a few hearts, but it won’t help you in heaven.”

On Mimesis

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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Aristotle meant that poetry was mimetic of all of things, independent of another poet’s unique perspective. It is not necessary that poets imitate other poets, but that they imitate life.

Ur Poems: Emily Vogel

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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What Inspires Us To Write Poetry?

On Assignments

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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It occurred to me that if a poet or writer is to develop discipline, he or she must have some sense of assignment.

To Beginner Poets

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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A poet CAN be taught to twist his pain into clever metaphor and image, but at the same time, must have healthy relationship to his sanity.

On Poets and Speakers

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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I’ll read a poem about death, sadness, and strife, and in some cases, the suffering of the speaker, and then meet and converse with the contented and well-adjusted poet.