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Poem of the Week: Alison Rogers Napoleon

by Colie Hoffman Poems of the Week
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[Cycle]

Poetry as Fun

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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Most poetry, before the 20th century was meant to be relational. Modernism and post-modernism decided to disconnect from this relational dynamic.

#thethepoetics: Small Press Edition

by Micah Towery Society
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A few weeks ago, the miraculous Metta Sama(~), master of @thethepoetry, hosted a discussion under the Twitter hashtag #thethepoetics with editors from @aquariuspress, @dzancbooks, @notell, @yesyesbooks, and @WordWorksEditor, as well as a host of other poets.

Poem of the Week: Josh Hockensmith

by Colie Hoffman Poems of the Week
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[in our bodies now]

Songs That Influenced My Poetry

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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My first and last love are songs.

Poetry Scenes: Chicago

by Connor Stratman Poetry and Poetics
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When I’m asked about poetry in Chicago, I’m inclined to reply with the old Quaker response: “I don’t know what you’re talking about.”

Bat & Man

by Brian Chappell Reviews & Interviews
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It’s also the nature of mythology to slowly but surely seep into the collective consciousness.

Poem of the Week: Elizabeth Clark Wessel

by Bianca Stone Poems of the Week
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[The House Wakes]

At National Tool

by Joe Weil Society
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Ideas are never as important as appearances and narratives. The groove of the story can outlast any series of good ideas, and no idea stands a chance unless it can find a groove.

Alfred Corn’s Transatlantic Bridge

by Alfred Corn eBooks
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Poet, fiction writer, and critic Alfred Corn applies his special language skills to a comparison of the two dominant versions of the English language. The United States and Britain have been described as “divided by a common language,” but this guide will help speakers from both countries make their way in the other.

Poem of the Week: Alina Gregorian

by Bianca Stone Poems of the Week
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[Utah]

A Grumpy Old Man Laments

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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I am a “mutt,” a cut up, a clown. Clowns are trained to run the emotional registers from funny to sad, from sublime to raunchy. Clowns believe that these mixed registers provide the ontological truth of existing.

Chapbooks: A Short History of the Short Book

by Sam Riedel Arts & Society
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Scholars of Anglo-Saxon history and language contend that the prefix “chap-” is derived from the ancient word “ceap,” while others maintain it is merely a corruption of “cheap;” however, most attribute the word’s popularity to the chapman—European peddler, reporter, and rogue-of-all-trades from the 16th to at least the 18th century.

Poem of the Week: Paige Taggart

by Bianca Stone Poems of the Week
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[from Get Your Slip On]

Possibility and Grace

by Joe Weil Society
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This is a strange story. It is liable to get me laughed at.

Poem of the Week: Walter Stone

by Bianca Stone Poems of the Week
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[Word to Oneself]

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