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[After Catullus and Horace]

This evening at Catholic mass, while everyone bowed their heads to pray, I asked Jesus not only to help me be good to my husband and my family, but also what he thought about my poetry. I heard a voice, perhaps in my head, or perhaps funneled out the church ceiling which said, “your poetry will touch a few hearts, but it won’t help you in heaven.”

Okay! Fine. Tea Obreht is a veritable prodigy, and The Tiger's Wife is uncannily good. Most (no, all) reviewers, as well as the likes of Colum McCann, TC Boyle, and Ann Patchett, say no less. But this novel is not just good for a twenty-five year old. Most of us would kill to kill it like she does.

[Selections from "Under Ben Bulben"]

Digress, digress, follow the nose of your longing.

Cursivism, Will Hubbard's slim, debut volume of prose poems published by Ugly Duckling Presse, begins with a simple piece of advice that may be one of the most challenging charges facing anyone who is trying to figure out how to live, "just let it happen."

[Canoe]

I sometimes think African American "cool" and Irish humor developed out of an awareness of the truth that life is not merciful.

Being in workshop with you isn’t going to make me famous, nor am I going to end up on Judd Apatow’s speed dial, no matter how good the on-screen chemistry between me and Seth Rogan might be...

[Extract from My Ragged Company, #19]

Certainly postmodern works has blurred generic boundaries, but Alexander seems to be showing, in an almost Pynchon-like way, that even the nuances of specialized language can be conscripted and subsumed into a larger poetic utterance.

Wallace over the years was most interested in narratives of suffering. Boredom (so closely linked to the problem of addiction, which he addressed in Infinite Jest) is one such type, and it takes center stage in his last book, an unfinished project published under the title The Pale King.

[Bloodwork]

The handling of such overwhelming material is first and last, a question of form. Grief, loss, outrage, must be made portable.

Ben Pease interviews Ben Fama on the Scattered Rhymes podcast.

[A selection from Upriver]