TheThe Poetry
≡ Menu

Mary Karr and Christopher Robinson discuss Thomas Lux's poem "Tarantulas on the Lifebuoy."

[Symptoms of Island]

I must describe the physical sensation this poem had on me. It was a hot and humid day, and the house was full of fans whirring, and flies buzzing, and no one was home.

It occurred to me that if a poet or writer is to develop discipline, he or she must have some sense of assignment.

Sestets is what it seems to be and a lot more: a small book of small poems that resurrect what they can from the nothingness.

Dawn Marie Knopf’s poetry feeds off a particularly American mythos: old wives’ tales, Farmer’s Almanacs, the revered stories of American pop heroes before they made it big.

Add Clark Coolidge to the list of great American poets that nobody is talking about.

[Poem in the Manner of Charles Bukowski]

Mary Karr and Christopher Robinson discuss Czeslaw Milosz's poem "Late Ripeness."

In books rowed up on the shelf you see, for the first time, your own death.

If Martha Stewart had a child who went rogue, moved to New York City, and started writing poetry and making books, that child may have turned out to produce something as crafty-bohemian as Small Anchor Press does.

All answers, of course, are functions of the question, so...take this list with a grain of salt.

[Do you get any reception here?]

When gaining a foothold among the establishment, it is important the so called "outsiders" or mavericks have a figure fully anchored within the establishment who can be "acceptable."

A poet CAN be taught to twist his pain into clever metaphor and image, but at the same time, must have healthy relationship to his sanity.

Why do we make lists?