Micah Towery

Excellence in Student Writing: Introduction

by Micah Towery Arts & Society
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That’s when I feel most satisfied as a teacher: when I see a spark of something in a student that I admire.

Excellence in Student Writing: Katharine Sell

by Micah Towery Poetry and Poetics
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The poem’s argues that order can be found and already exists among the chaos of nature, but that it takes the individual’s artistic craft to create meaning to make the order’s presence known and evident.

Two Works of Spiritual Aspiration: Flowers and Vogel

by Micah Towery Reviews & Interviews
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Poems are “instruments for thinking” (Allen Grossman). The object of a poet’s thought, however, is often unstated–especially in lyric poetry. Lyric poetry never speaks to an audience, and so–as it is when we are alone–the speaker doess not feel compelled to explicitly state the object of thought but only the thoughts themselves. In this review, I want to try and discern these objects of thought in the works of two poets whose work seem directed at resolving particularly spiritual problems.

Poem of the Week: Tom Sleigh

by Micah Towery Poems of the Week
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Landscape

Poem of the Week: Micah Towery

by Colie Hoffman Poems of the Week
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[An Invitation (Horace's Ode i.20)]

Google Translates Poetry

by Micah Towery Poetry and Poetics
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Meta-lord of the cloud-lords of meta of!

The Cartographer Electric is Dead

by Micah Towery Poetry and Poetics
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This was a true community magazine, and it fed on the energy of the readings and was inspired into existence the other poets we knew and were excited to read. It was a great experience, and I think that everyone should start a small community rag like this. It doesn’t have to be big or ambitious…just something that you share between you, your friends, and their friends. I don’t spend lots of time reading the latest issue of Ploughshares, but I was always interested in reading local indie rags like the one we were putting out.

Imitation/Interaction: the Greek Anthology, Augustine, the Psalms

by Micah Towery Academia
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It’s immediately clear why Augustine is often seen as the last classical and first medieval man. He marks the ultimate synthesis of classical rhetoric and sensibilities with the concept of self that marked the Judeo-Christian tradition. As Cahill points out, the Psalms stand out among classical literature, as exceptionally personal. Augustine, says Ronald Heine, was “the undisputed master of using the psalms to lay one’s soul bare before God in the praise and confession of prayer….The psalms permeate everything Augustine wrote.” Rowan Williams points out that the very first sentence of Confessions is a quotation from the psalms. Augustine weaves them throughout such that we hardly know when the words are his and when they are not (a modern citation nightmare).