Poetry and Poetics

Poem of the Week

by Dawn Leas Poems of the Week
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Prayer for Topaz, 1942 Dear God, Mom said you are busy and don’t have time to listen to a little 8-year-old Negro girl from North Carolina and her foolishness, like praying for a box of candy. That would be selfish. But if it’s really important she said, then I should take it to you in […]

Poem of the Week: Ned Balbo

by Dawn Leas Poems of the Week
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First Thaw

Homer to Gluck: First Lines

by Sarah Foil Poetry and Poetics
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Our twitter and tumblr followers shared their favorite first lines of poetry.

Didactic Sonnet

by Joe Weil Academia
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If Plato came back today and saw the workshop, craft obsessed nature of poetics, he’d give his approval, but not for reasons poets might like: Plato would approve because the stupidity of inspiration has been removed from the writing of poems.

Why Poetry is Sometimes Not Enough

by Emily Vogel Writing
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This evening at Catholic mass, while everyone bowed their heads to pray, I asked Jesus not only to help me be good to my husband and my family, but also what he thought about my poetry. I heard a voice, perhaps in my head, or perhaps funneled out the church ceiling which said, “your poetry will touch a few hearts, but it won’t help you in heaven.”

On My Pedagogical Approach (or something of the sort)

by Joe Weil Academia
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Digress, digress, follow the nose of your longing.

On Poetry and Loss, Part 2

by Joe Weil Memoir
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I sometimes think African American “cool” and Irish humor developed out of an awareness of the truth that life is not merciful.

The Four Functions and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

by Joe Weil Academia
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As Kafka said: “The crows maintain that a single crow could destroy the heavens; doubtless this is so, but it proves nothing against the heavens, for the heavens signify simply: the impossibility of crows.”

Creative Stupidity

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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Many people do not become artists not because they are stupid, but because they are incapable of suspending the thinking/feeling functions. They fail to become writers and musicians and painters because they cannot enter their highest stupidity.

Kenneth Burke: Do you Eros into Logos? (with a note on Tu Fu)

by Micah Towery Poetry and Poetics
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Poets who write for self-expression write awful poetry. They don’t seek advice but affirmation.

Poetry Fix, Episode 20: Weldon Kees

by Chris Robinson Poetry and Poetics
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Mary Karr and Christopher Robinson discuss Weldon Kees’s poem “1926.”

Ur Poems: Emily Vogel

by Emily Vogel Poetry and Poetics
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What Inspires Us To Write Poetry?

Scattered Rhymes: Morgan Parker

by Ben Pease Poetry and Poetics
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Morgan Parker describes herself as equipped with the eyes of a surrealist, ears of an ethnographer, tongue of a cynical comedian, and heart of a brooding sixteen-year old.

Writing Without an Idea

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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I don’t usually have an idea in mind when I begin to write.

Poetry Fix, Episode 19: Thomas Lux

by Chris Robinson Poetry and Poetics
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Mary Karr and Christopher Robinson discuss Thomas Lux’s poem “Tarantulas on the Lifebuoy.”

Scattered Rhymes: Dawn Marie Knopf

by Ben Pease Poetry and Poetics
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Dawn Marie Knopf’s poetry feeds off a particularly American mythos: old wives’ tales, Farmer’s Almanacs, the revered stories of American pop heroes before they made it big.

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