poets

“He Too Sings America: Jazz, Laughter, and Sound as Protest in Langston Hughes’s Harlem”

August 18, 2014
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Poet Brian Fanelli explores Jazz, laughter and sound in Langston Hughes’s work and world.

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Poem of the Week: Maria Mazziotti Gillan

April 11, 2014
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Watching the Pelican Die On TV, I watch the pelican with its mouth wide open, its wings and body coated with oil. Is it screaming? I do not hear the sound and since this is a photograph, I don’t know if it was caught in that mouth-stretched howl when it died or if it’s howling […]

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Poem of the Week: Christine Gelineau

April 4, 2014

Bliss

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Poem of the Week: Ned Balbo

March 21, 2014
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First Thaw

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Homer to Gluck: First Lines

February 3, 2014
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Our twitter and tumblr followers shared their favorite first lines of poetry.

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Lee Sharkey’s Calendars of Fire

October 3, 2013
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In The Book of the Dead, Muriel Rukeyser writes, “What three things can never be done?
 Forget. Keep silent. Stand alone.” In Calendars of Fire, Lee Sharkey refuses to be that historian or activist, tamed in middle age, no longer pained by injustice.

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Robert Duncan: The Collected Early Poems and Plays

May 21, 2013
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The breadth of that poetic growth is in itself a fantastic teacher.

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Georg Trakl in Plato’s Republic

May 15, 2013
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Poetry, like music, like dance, might be defined as the precision of ecstasy, and the ecstasy of precision, an ecstatic precision, and measured ecstasy.

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Why Weirdness Can Be a Good Thing: the Aesthetic Satisfactions of a Compelling Strangeness

February 11, 2013
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What is the difference between a poem we call mawkish, or overly sentimental, and a poem that carries the right amount of sentimentality and wit?

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A Primer on Writing and Imagery (for those who want it)

December 19, 2012
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You will hear in workshops: “Show, don’t tell,” but that’s a bunch of malarkey. It should be: “Show what tells.”

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What Is This Thing Called Free Verse? (A primer for those who want it)

December 13, 2012
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Poets want to get away with murder.

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13 Ways of Looking at the Pragmatist Ashbery, OR Getting Down to the Nitty-Gritty: Ashbery and the Central Doctrine of American Pragmatism

November 19, 2012
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So what are some other major facets of Ashbery’s relationship to American pragmatism?

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How I Stumbled Into Teaching In The Arts

September 26, 2012
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I can talk to kids all day. They interest me. They will never pretend to like you. For that I am forever grateful.

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The Disappearing: Introduction

July 6, 2012
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The Disappearing is a new app for iPhone, iPad and Android that (literally) explores poetry and place. Beginning with a collection of over 100 poems about Sydney, the app creates a poetic map charting traces, fragmentary histories, impressions and memories.

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Teacher as Midwife

April 18, 2012
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You want to have an open sesame for every soul you encounter. You want something to open in them and for them, and when you are at your best, you don’t care if they ever say thank you.

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Garbage Picking in Eliot’s Waste Land, Part 1

March 12, 2012
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Eliot out-dueled the English until they erected his memorial in Westminster Abbey next to the graves of Dryden, Tennyson, and Browning; men Eliot spent his life burying.

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