Rilke

Homer to Gluck: First Lines

by Sarah Foil Poetry and Poetics
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Our twitter and tumblr followers shared their favorite first lines of poetry.

Poetry Essay #2: Careerism Versus the Work at Hand

by Joe Weil The Other
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Other than that, remember you are going to die, no matter how many awards you win, and you will spend large parts of your life forgetting that. Careerism is only evil if it makes you forget first and last things, for art comes from the contemplation of first and last things–lasting art.

‘Remembering Mary’: An Interview With Mary Jarrell

by Lisa A. Flowers Reviews & Interviews
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In 2002, I had the privilege of interviewing Ms Jarrell for a proposed documentary on the World War II air war, and the literature that had defined it. Though the project never came to fruition, the interview was, of course, invaluable in its own way, and took on a life of its own.

Poem of the Week: Carolyn Kizer

by Joe Weil Poems of the Week
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[The Great Blue Heron]

Poem of the Week: Wallace Stevens

by Joe Weil Aesthetics
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[Large Red Man Reading]

“Minor” Poets and Imagery

by Joe Weil Poetry and Poetics
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Literary theorists use literature as an excuse for ontological truths (or gender, or sexual, or identity issues). This is a legitimate way to ransack texts, but it will not teach you how to write. Ontology begins with detail selection—in terms of word choice, verbal relationships, rhythm. A theorist wouldn’t know what to do with this poem, unless the theorist started to write a book on kinetics in terms of verbal constructs and the cultural bias of admiring athletes as per one’s gender, or class. Minor may only mean a theorist can’t find much to theorize about.