Robert Lowell

John Ashbery: A Pageant

September 9, 2013
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Characters:Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, W.H. Auden, James Merril, Robert Lowell

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They Used to Dance On Saturday Nights

September 27, 2012
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Certainly this slim volume has something to teach us about magic and control, how indistinguishable the two often are from each other.

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Thoughts on George Oppen

August 29, 2012
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That morning I walked home reciting Oppen’s poem to myself, and I could not wear out the truth of it, or stop the overwhelming sense of grief and anger I felt, but also awe–awe at the child’s calm, her soft little voice, poor Kenny’s deep animal moan when her flesh sloughed off in his hand.

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Melodrama, MFAs, and Life as a Movie: Carina Finn talks with Lisa Marie Basile

July 3, 2012
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I wanted to create a space where I could be honest without feeling required to adhere to some arbitrary notion of what was True.

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Lowell’s Bedlam: John McCullough

July 6, 2011
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All acts of observation are partial and reveal as much about the observer as the observed.

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Lowell’s Bedlam: M G Stephens

July 5, 2011
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Alfred Corn’s play gives us an inner portrait of Robert Lowell that is not found in either the biography or the poetry itself.

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Alfred Corn’s play Lowell’s Bedlam

March 29, 2011

[April 7, London]

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Literary Movements: Insider as Outsider and Token Renegade

December 29, 2010
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When gaining a foothold among the establishment, it is important the so called “outsiders” or mavericks have a figure fully anchored within the establishment who can be “acceptable.”

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Seventeen Years Ago Last March: Elizabeth Bishop’s Grand Finale

March 6, 2010
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‘Crusoe in England’ was first published in The New Yorker in 1971, then later collected in ‘Geography III,’ perhaps Bishop’s finest single volume of poems. (Only recently I discovered the title of which was suggested to her by John Ashbery. He had found a little geography textbook of the eponymous name, and sent it to her, thinking she’d rather enjoy it. Turns out, she did.)

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Blogging through Grossman, Part 3: Poetic Promiscuity.

March 2, 2010
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We recent poets have two great tools at our disposal: freedom of poetic license, and freedom of publishing. Generally, we can say whatever we want, and get a significant number of people to hear what we have to say. The question is whether this freedom has led to better poetry or degeneration. Perhaps that’s not the best way to put it. The question should be, even if somebody is doing something amazing and new in poetry, would we even see it? Will we travel all this way to find that we really did need the gatekeepers of poetry??

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Some Books on My Mind, or {Potential} Purchases of Imperishables

February 21, 2010
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Hands up, anyone who has read the whole of Herodotus and the whole of Thucydides! And Saint-Simon? And Cardinal de Retz? But even the great nineteenth-century cycles of novels are more often talked about than read.

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